Every Breath You Take
2019 Winner

Every Breath You Take

Jagran Prakashan

New Delhi, India

Category Best Idea to Encourage Print Readership or Engagement

Media associated with this campaign

Overview of this campaign

“AIR POLLUTION THE NEW TOBACCO” - DR TEDROS ADHANOM, WHO DIRECTOR GENERAL

The simple act of breathing is killing 7mn people/year (more than HIV, tuberculosis and malaria combined), but ‘a smog of complacency pervades the planet’.

11 of the world’s 12 most polluted cities are in India (WHO), denting our GDP by $221bn/year (World Bank). The average Indian would live 4.3 years longer if we met WHO’s guidelines for clean air.

WE ARE FAILING OUR CHILDREN

Air pollution shames us all. From Beijing to Los Angeles, Marseille to Myanmar, with every breath, our 1.8bn children are inhaling 20mn particles, storing up a public health time bomb.

THE ELEPHANT IN THE SMOG-FILLED ROOM

The government promotes a Clean India campaign to build toilets and tidy streets, but shies away from broaching the electorally trickier question of air pollution - harder to fix and risks treading on the toes of big industry and small farmers. The environment minister, denies that people are dying from air pollution. Election manifestos promise to waive off farmer loans, give free rice, education, laptops….but not a single politician shows gumption to promise even an intent to tackle air pollution.

IF YOU LIVE IN AN INDIAN CITY, EVERY BREATH YOU TAKE IS KILLING YOU

It’s puzzling why clean air isn’t a global priority. Scarier than the smog is the stoicism of people which has spawned a $200mn industry helping them cope - Masks, green walls, pollution-monitoring apps and air purifiers.

Dainik Jagran believes it was time to present the health argument strongly for citizens to connect air pollution with individual health and push for change. And who better to push the argument than the next generation which is doomed to bear the burden of our inaction. When we fail our children, they rise to the occasion. This was our campaign:

To serve a grim reminder of what the future holds, and driving change rather than following it by capitalizing on the simmering tension around the issue 


Results for this campaign

Dainik Jagran took up the case in Kanpur (ranked No.1 city in the WHO global pollution chart). We had to seize this moment, and make it a defining one. To a public resigned to living with bad air, we couldn't use rational arguments. We had to fight this with a new symbol. This is what we did:

INVENTING A SURVIVAL KIT FOR A POLLUTION APOCALYPSE

We got children to create a “Survival Kit” for their “voyage on the planet” – a unique apparatus comprising a plastic water bottle with a sapling inside it, and a tube connected to an oxygen mask. The silent child carrying this Survival Kit came to symbolize the fight against pollution and served a stark reminder of the burden we’re passing to the next generation.

Thousands marked their social media status updates and profiles with the visual of the child with the Survival Kit.

19,000 children marched on streets wearing “survival kits”. They silently stood outside government buildings, at traffic crossings….holding placards saying “Is this how we’re supposed to breathe?”

Their silence starkly contrasted with the silence of citizens who’ve resigned themselves to the reality of toxic air.

The dystopian future seems imminent. The world that was born out of the “Big Bang”, may well crash out with a “Bronchial Spasm” if we don’t act now. The human race has survived many bumps on the highway of history – this time we’re blinded by smog. This existential crisis needs us to keep fighting to push citizens and governments to act.

Impact on Brand

Brand Parameters : Dainik Jagran scored the highest on Brand Awareness, Satisfaction, Preference, Intention, and Recommendation – outscoring competition by a massive 1.55X lead over No.2

Brand Imagery: We outscored competition on every imagery parameter. The key leads being in

- This newspaper is inspirational/motivational

- This newspaper takes on relevant issues 

  - This newspaper is helping create positive change in society 

Source : Brand Study, Dec 2018


Contact

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