The 85th INMA World Congress came to a close Tuesday afternoon in The TimesCenter after three days of insightful discussion. Topics ranged from the future of news and to transforming from print to digital to advice for publishers and tips for surviving in the media world.

Steve Hills, president and general manager of The Washington Post, kicked off the day by exploring the new avenues and plans spearheaded by new Washington Post owner, Jeff Bezos.

A panel made up of Aller Media’s Adina Broady Aasebö, MittMedia’s AnnaKarin Lith and El Colombiano’s Martha Ortiz shared their own innovative audience strategies.

Another panel followed made up of New York Times Alex Hardiman, Quartz’s Joy Robins, Fairfax Media’s Stefan Savva and Schibsted Group’s Ian Vannman shared their success secrets to attracting readers and generating revenue via mobile.

Three speakers spoke on the panel “The Next Generation Re-Imagined Newsroom” discussing the changes and innovations taking place in three separate news organisations. Nicole Carroll, vice president of news and executive editor of the Arizona Republic/Gannett, began by speaking about key points their journalists are using to evolve in the newsroom and start taking new approaches.

Sam Jacobs, senior editor of Time Inc., took the floor next and explained how media we see now is taking form from media we have already seen in the past.

Jan-Eric Peters, editor-in-chief of Die Welt and N24, finished the panel by giving a timeline of changes taking place within thie newsroom, one they have named to represent their workflow and content: “Key to our success is our so called ‘newsroom of three speeds,’” he said.

Gerold Riedmann CEO of Russmedia Digital in Austria and Edward Roussel, chief innovation officer at Dow Jones finished up the panels talking about the best systems and practices for rapid product development.

Earl Wilkinson, executive director/CEO of INMA, wrapped up the conference in the evening reflecting discussions that took place throughout the entire conference: He outlined the differences between legacy and digital media companies.

“I’m sure everyone in this room has some kind of transformation story,” Wilkinson said. “Start telling it.

The last day of the conference generated a twitter audience of more than 12 million people and left INMA World Congress attendees with helpful advice and information to take back to share with their companies all over the world.