Swedish publisher Expressen’s history with video goes back to the 1990s, a time when many of its journalists couldn’t watch because the Web site’s video player was too sophisticated for their office computers.

Today, the news-centered approach has boosted Expressen’s profile in both the print and digital space.

When the publisher obtained an inflammatory video made from a cell phone belonging to a member of the Swedish Parliament, Expressen gained the kind of exposure that simply cannot be bought.

Expressen also riveted the nation when it broke the story of several politicians “acting violently and racially abusing people on the streets of Stockholm.” Complementing the print and online coverage was the sensational video clip from the phone, which served as the centerpiece of the story. The video aired both on ExpressenTV and on the newspaper’s Web site.

Parts of the video aired each day, attracting the attention of both readers and broadcast networks, which ran the video clips with the condition that ExpressenTV was credited.

“This was probably the scandal of the year in Sweden in 2012,” says Editor-in-Chief Thomas Mattsson. “Even though the story was initiated by our investigative reporting team, it was well taken care of by the ExpressenTV staff.”